Bug 4488 - Unreadable directory causes no deletion without explanation
Unreadable directory causes no deletion without explanation
Status: NEW
Product: rsync
Classification: Unclassified
Component: core
2.6.9
PPC Mac OS X
: P3 minor
: ---
Assigned To: Wayne Davison
Rsync QA Contact
:
Depends on:
Blocks:
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Reported: 2007-04-05 00:53 UTC by Scott
Modified: 2009-09-13 16:28 UTC (History)
0 users

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Description Scott 2007-04-05 00:53:05 UTC
Having an unreadable (unix permissions set to no read access) directory within the source directory causes a complaint that is apparently considered an I/O error and therefore prevents --delete and --delete-excluded from acting without any sort of explanation.  Such an explanation should be included in -vv output.  Alternatively, or in addition, a single file without read access should possibly not prevent other files in independent paths from being deleted.

Output for Reference:
building file list ... rsync: opendir "~/.PfaEdit" failed: Permission denied (13)
[Lots of transferred files, etc.]
rsync error: some files could not be transferred (code 23) at /SourceCache/rsync/rsync-24/rsync/main.c(717)
Comment 1 Matt McCutchen 2009-09-13 16:28:40 UTC
(In reply to comment #0)
> Having an unreadable (unix permissions set to no read access) directory within
> the source directory causes a complaint that is apparently considered an I/O
> error and therefore prevents --delete and --delete-excluded from acting without
> any sort of explanation.  Such an explanation should be included in -vv output.

When I try this, I see the following message regardless of verbosity:

IO error encountered -- skipping file deletion

>  Alternatively, or in addition, a single file without read access should
> possibly not prevent other files in independent paths from being deleted.

That would be a good enhancement request.  Each directory in the file list could have a flag indicating whether files might be missing from it; for even finer granularity, individual inaccessible files could be represented by specially marked file-list entries.