Bug 2845 - Smbclient stop with error with large directories copy
Smbclient stop with error with large directories copy
Product: Samba 3.0
Classification: Unclassified
Component: smbclient
x86 Linux
: P3 critical
: none
Assigned To: Samba Bugzilla Account
Samba QA Contact
Depends on:
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Reported: 2005-07-01 05:36 UTC by Daniel Fonseca Alves
Modified: 2006-04-08 23:00 UTC (History)
0 users

See Also:

Debug level 10 log from reporter (17.90 KB, application/octet-stream)
2005-07-09 14:39 UTC, Jeremy Allison
no flags Details

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Description Daniel Fonseca Alves 2005-07-01 05:36:15 UTC

I am trying to copy a directory from a Windows 2000 server SP4 to a Linux box
with the follow script:

smbclient //"Windows 2000 Server"/share password -U administrator -c
"prompt;recurse;mget directory*"

With small directories ok, but large directories the follow error occur:

client_check_incoming_message: out of seq. seq num 634955 matches. We were
expecting seq 634955
signing_good: BAD SIG: seq 634955

At middle of the copy. Them the copy repeat the follow error and stop:

"Server packet had invalid SMB signature! "

Goggle report the discussion in then follow link(someone create a patch).


I am think it is the same error.

I am using Debian Sarge 3.1a.

Someone can help me ?
Comment 1 Jeremy Allison 2005-07-01 12:01:38 UTC
The mail thread you point out has a patch included that went into the Samba
source code at that time.
Can you send me a debug level 10 log around the failure ? The error message you
are reporting is very strange with a message saying we were expecting number X,
but number X matches. They are the same number...

Are you sure this is the error message that you're really getting ?


Comment 2 Jeremy Allison 2005-07-09 14:39:15 UTC
Created attachment 1300 [details]
Debug level 10 log from reporter
Comment 3 Gerald (Jerry) Carter 2006-04-08 23:00:14 UTC
Please retest against a current release and reopen if the issue still exists.